Back to Top
jillthompson:

le-desir-de-charcot:

Gustav Klimt (Austrian, 1862-1918), Farmhouse with Birch Trees, 1903.  Oil on canvas, 110 x 110 cm.

Good gracious I love this!

jillthompson:

le-desir-de-charcot:

Gustav Klimt (Austrian, 1862-1918), Farmhouse with Birch Trees, 1903.  Oil on canvas, 110 x 110 cm.

Good gracious I love this!

(via jason-minor)

pancreases: Your art style is really cool, I loved the work you did in The Sandman... have a good one!

Many thanks!

Anonymous: Hello Marc, I wanted to ask if you are doing commission pieces for this year's San Diego Comic-Con? I recently saw a piece you did on the entire Endless family and was wondering if you still do pieces? I love your artwork, in particular your rendition of Morpheus. Please let me know if you are up for doing commissions. Many thanks!

Hello! Sorry for the late response. I’m not planning to attend the con in San Diego … but I do sometimes do commissions via the mail. As I’m running very (very) late on a few at present, try me in a month or so at my e-mail address (on the bio page of my Tumblr) if you’re interested.

Nattily dressed and coiffed me … posing stiffly, happily in front of my grandparents’ house on Keystone Avenue in Chicago in 1966… probably after Sunday School. Photo by Dad.

Nattily dressed and coiffed me … posing stiffly, happily in front of my grandparents’ house on Keystone Avenue in Chicago in 1966… probably after Sunday School. Photo by Dad.

marchempel:

Medium: Pigma Micron, India ink. Merchandise: http://www.cafepress.com/nakedbrain/7963041

marchempel:

Medium: Pigma Micron, India ink. Merchandise: http://www.cafepress.com/nakedbrain/7963041

A 3D shot of me, taken circa 1992 by David Chelsea. Appropriately, I am holding my own 3D camera, a 1954 TDC Stereo Colorist. Fwiw, I no longer wear pink shirts, pink flamingo bolo ties, or mullet-shaped hair.
For stereo free-viewing (small or large version): cross your eyes a bit until left and right images fuse; if all goes well, center image will be in 3D.

A 3D shot of me, taken circa 1992 by David Chelsea. Appropriately, I am holding my own 3D camera, a 1954 TDC Stereo Colorist. Fwiw, I no longer wear pink shirts, pink flamingo bolo ties, or mullet-shaped hair.

For stereo free-viewing (small or large version): cross your eyes a bit until left and right images fuse; if all goes well, center image will be in 3D.

dcpast:


1924. “Street scene, young women, Washington, D.C.” Harris & Ewing Collection, Library of Congress.

dcpast:

1924. “Street scene, young women, Washington, D.C.” Harris & Ewing Collection, Library of Congress.

(via artdecoblog)

Vintage sheet music from my favorite science fiction musical romance, Just Imagine (1930 [set in 1980!]). Featuring El Brendel, Maureen O’Sullivan, and some forgettable music and comedy. Cool sets and visual effects. I think only one print of this rare film exists, but no official DVD release.

Vintage sheet music from my favorite science fiction musical romance, Just Imagine (1930 [set in 1980!]). Featuring El Brendel, Maureen O’Sullivan, and some forgettable music and comedy. Cool sets and visual effects. I think only one print of this rare film exists, but no official DVD release.

Vintage sheet music for “The ‘Free and Easy’” (from the film Free and Easy, 1930 [Buster Keaton’s first talkie]).

Vintage sheet music for “The ‘Free and Easy’” (from the film Free and Easy, 1930 [Buster Keaton’s first talkie]).

part2of3:

modmad:

pewpuupalace:

fearless-onisuika:

carry-on-my-otp:

If Stuntmen from the old movies don’t have your full respect then I just don’t know what to say to you

Yo this so much. At the advent of cinema these people were literally willing to die for their art. It’s crazy, and awesome.

Also if you find this awesome, people go check out a 2006 movie called The Fall, about a 1920’s stuntman’s stay in hospital after a stunt gone wrong.

man things were wacky before color was invented

is nobody going to mention that these are all the same guy; Buster Keaton, one of the sweetest and most creative men in film history who did all of his own stunts and directed almost all of his own films (until things went sour post-1928 but that’s another story)?

also in that last one he wasn’t supposed to miss the building; you are literally seeing a stunt going wrong, but they kept it in the film and built on it, extending the scene to having him falling down the building… after he’d recovered from the injuries he sustained, anyway

YEAH HOW ABOUT THAT

he was given the name Buster by Harry Houdini himself:

According to a frequently-repeated story, which may be apocryphal,[9] Keaton acquired the nickname “Buster” at about eighteen months of age. Keaton told interviewer Fletcher Markle that Houdini happened to be present one day when the young Keaton took a tumble down a long flight of stairs without injury. After the infant sat up and shook off his experience, Houdini remarked, “That was a real buster!” According to Keaton, in those days, the word “buster” was used to refer to a spill or a fall that had the potential to produce injury. After this, it was Keaton’s father who began to use the nickname to refer to the youngster.”

(via artdecoblog)

midcenturymodernfreak:

Moanin’" | Art Blakey & The Jazz Messengers

Some Sunday afternoon jazz …

THEME BY PARTI