Marc Hempel

All-knowing, all-powerful, multi-dimensional, creative being ... and drawer of funny pictures
A new webcomic I’m working on. Follow me at my other Tumblr, where I post new nonsense every Tuesday and Thursday!

A new webcomic I’m working on. Follow me at my other Tumblr, where I post new nonsense every Tuesday and Thursday!

Though you may travel the world to find the beautiful, you must have it within you or you will find it not.

—Ralph Waldo Emerson (via thecalminside)

You are not separate from the whole. You are one with the sun, the earth, the air. You don’t have a life. You are life.

— Eckhart Tolle (via purplebuddhaproject)

(via thecalminside)

More insightful witticism at my other Tumblr! New comics posted every Tuesday and Thursday!

More insightful witticism at my other Tumblr! New comics posted every Tuesday and Thursday!

haroldlloyds:

Happy Birthday Joseph Frank "Buster" Keaton VI
4 October 1895 - 1 February 1966

"To answer a question which has been asked of me hundreds of times: Was Buster solemn and unsmiling as he always appeared in his films? NO! A thousand times no! I’ve never known anyone to laugh more than he did. In fact, when we were shooting, he spoiled many a scene by cracking up with laughter.” - Bartine Burkett, 1981

(via haroldlloyds)

Throwback Thursday! Ca. 1993, I photocopied my ca. 1988 driver’s license, which I had to surrender when it expired. So, here’s a rare pic of me (and some other stats) from about the time that I was working on the first Gregory book (DC Comics / Piranha Press).

Throwback Thursday! Ca. 1993, I photocopied my ca. 1988 driver’s license, which I had to surrender when it expired. So, here’s a rare pic of me (and some other stats) from about the time that I was working on the first Gregory book (DC Comics / Piranha Press).

Anonymous asked: Hello! I was wondering if you have anything to say about the creation of gregory at all? It's one of my favorite comics

Thank you, nice anon! Okay, then, The Gregory Story …

It was ca. 1988 and I was the regular penciler on Comico’s Jonny Quest comic, which was a lot of fun until it wasn’t. I had been a big fan of the original, prime time TV series, but after a couple years of working on the title, the novelty had worn off … and, importantly, drawing Jonny (as “on model” as I could manage) didn’t allow me to express who I was as a person or creator. Well, back in 1986 I had done this one-off humor strip that I really liked called “It’s Spring!” for Honk! (Fantagraphics); it was the same story that later appeared in Gregory, but the unnamed, straitjacketed character was ganglier and more adult-like. So, when Jonny ended, I fully immersed myself in developing this loony, lovable guy … named him (well, he sorta named himself), made him smaller and cuter, added supporting characters, and wrote lots of new material of varying story lengths. It was a joyful explosion of creativity that enabled me to fully be myself on the comics page – a much appreciated opportunity after working as a collaborator on Jonny and other titles for several years. Well, at some point I had forty-plus pages of Gregory strips, so I shopped it around as a book. While Fantagraphics and others were interested, I ended up going with DC Comics and their new Piranha Press imprint, mostly because they were paying an advance, and I thought that the title would get better publicity. Fast forward: Two printings sold out, the book was nominated for Harvey and Eisner Awards, I did three more volumes, and there’s been some Hollywood interest off and on over the years. Personally, I’m just grateful that Gregory is still fondly remembered after two and a half decades!

Interesting story: Hoping to get a foreword written for the book, I sent material to (one of my heroes and major influences) Charles Schulz. He wrote back saying, essentially, that he didn’t get it, and that I should try doing something in a more realistic vein. Oh, well!

smallpresspreviews:

LITTLE NEMO: DREAM ANOTHER DREAM

by Bill Sienkiewicz, Jim Rugg, Box Brown, Denis Kitchen, Paul Pope, Craig Thompson, Farel Dalrymple, et al

Published by Locust Moon Press

Over 100 of today’s best cartoonists pay tribute to comics’ greatest innovator, Winsor McCay, in one giant book. In this 144-page, 16” x 21” hardcover, many of the world’s finest creators have dreamed up new Little Nemo in Slumberland strips, following their own voices down paths lit by McCay.

Taking on the same giant, broadsheet newspaper-sized canvas as McCay, artists such as Michael Allred, Paul Pope, Yuko Shimizu, J.H. Williams III, Charles Vess, David Mack, J.G. Jones, Craig Thompson, Paolo Rivera, Carla Speed McNeil, Bill Sienkiewicz, P. Craig Russell, Ronald Wimberly, Denis Kitchen, Jill Thompson, Stephen R. Bissette, Gabriel Bá & Fábio Moon, Farel Dalrymple, John Cassaday, Peter Bagge, Cliff Chiang, and over a hundred more have all done some of the very best work of their illustrious careers.

This is a love song for Winsor McCay, Little Nemo, and the infinite possibility of comics.

144 pages, color, 16” x 21” hardcover

ISBN: 978-0-9899076-9-9

Advance debut at SPX: September 13, 2014
Wide release at LMCF: October 25, 2014


$114.99

Order here

(via locustmooncomics)

nprbooks:

Broadsheets, fantastic dreams and 133 cartoonists have come together to pay tribute to Winsor McCay in an anthology called Little Nemo: Dream Another Dream

Winsor McCay was a newspaper cartoonist best known for “Little Nemo In Slumberland,” in which a little boy named Nemo has wondrous and thrilling dreams. Each strip ends the same way — Nemo is awakened and pulled back into reality.

The weekly comic strip ran from 1905-1911 in the New York Herald, from 1911-1914 in the New York American under the title “In The Land Of Wonderful Dreams” and then again from 1924-1926 in the New York Herald Tribune under its original name.

McCay was no stranger to the land of Nod; his other well-known strip was “Dreams of the Rarebit Fiend,” which also featured fantastical dreams that the characters blamed on their fondness for Welsh Rarebit — melted cheese mixed with a bit of beer and mustard, served on toast.

Locust Moon Press is publishing the book; co-owner Josh O’Neill told the comic blog The Outhousers that McCay was his favorite cartoonist of all time.

…and at our comic shop in Philly he’s a huge figure. We talk about his work all the time, and the two Sunday Press editions of his Little Nemo strips are well-worn and well-loved to say the least. He’s this giant, outsized inspiration for cartoonists and illustrators and animators, but the average person — even the average comic book fan — doesn’t even know who he is.

We wanted to shine a light back at him, refracted through the visions of the incredibly diverse, brilliant artists in the book. And we knew that the awe-inspiring intimidation factor of McCay would bring out the best in the people we were lucky enough to work with.

Contributing artists include those featured above: (in order of appearance) James Harvey, David Petersen and Toby Cypress.

More artists include Paul Pope, Craig ThompsonRoger Langridge, P. Craig Russell and Carla Speed McNeil, whose contribution involves Nemo being chased by a giant cat. 

The anthology will go on sale to the general public in October. 

Images via http://locustmoon.com/tag/dream-another-dream/ and http://www.comicstriplibrary.org/browse/results?title=2&page=1

- Intern Nicole

(via locustmooncomics)